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Bottlenose Dolphins

Help our Dolphins

Bottlenose dolphins are very vocal animals! They make a variety of sounds that may sound like clicks, moans, trills, grunts, squeaks, and even creaking doors. Interestingly, each bottlenose dolphin identifies itself with a signature whistle. These whistles are distinct to each dolphin, allowing scientists to identify individual dolphins by their particular whistle. Like bats,dolphins use sounds to help them detect objects in the water – a process known as echolocation. To echolocate, dolphins emit high-frequency clicks and interpret the resulting echoes, which helps them determine the size, shape, speed, distance, direction, and the internal structure of objects in the water!  

  

Current Project

Understanding Dolphin Populations

Bottlenose dolphins, a favorite marine mammal of many people, are found in temperate and tropical waters around the world. Interestingly, not much is known about Bottlenosed dolphins living in Florida’s north and central inland waterways. Unfortunately, we do know that these dolphins are exposed to a variety of human impacts. In order to learn more about the dolphins in these coastal regions, and the consequences of human impacts on these animals, scientists at Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute are using boats to survey dolphin populations and are investigating stranded dolphins to learn more about dolphin population structure, movement patterns, and health, as well as the impacts of human activities on these populations. This information is critical to developing conservation plans to help protect these animals. Additionally, through educational outreach effort, this project is working to teach community members about dolphin conservation! 

 

Partners

Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute